History

1936
Berlin
Summer Games
The very first torch was constructed by German sculptor, Walter Lemke. He also became the creator of the Olympic bell for the stadium in Berlin...
1948
London
Summer Games
Architect Ralph Lavers was even more of a fan of archeology. According to Lavers, he wanted to embody the appearance of a torch, which was used in ancient Rome and Greece, in the construction of the torch for the 1948 Olympics.
1952
Helsinki
Summer Games
A total of 22 torches were prepared for the Olympics in Helsinki. The author of the project's design was Finish architect, Aukusti Tuhka.
1952
Oslo
Winter Games
The torch of the Winter Olympics in Oslo was not lit in Olympia, but at the memorial of the pioneer of ski sport, Nordheim in the village of Morgedal. A total of 95 copies of the torch were made. At the "neck" of the torch, there were five Olympic rings and an inscription "Morgedal-Oslo".
1956
Melbourne
Summer Games
The design of the torch for those Olympics was also completed by Ralph Lavers, who created the torch for the 1948 London Games. It's not surprising that the torches ended up being similar.
1956
Cortina d'Ampezzo
Winter Games
The classic design of the torch was meant to emphasize the link with ancient Greek traditions. The torch for the Winter Olympics was lit in Rome by the ruins of the Temple of Jupiter and was blessed by the Pope.
1960
Squaw Valley
Winter Games
The idea of the torch was developed in the laboratory of John Hench with the support of Walt Disney Studios. Despite this, the torch was quite similar to its predecessor from Cortina d'Ampezzo.
1960
Rome
Summer Games
Created by architect Pier Luigi Nervi, the torch for the Rome Olympics, according to its creators, was designed to bring back the traditions of the antique torches of Ancient Rome. It was made from aluminum and covered with bronze. Weighing a total of 580 grams, it was one of the lightest torches in the history of the Relays.
1964
Innsbruck
Winter Games
By the Olympics in Innsbruck, a design was created which resembled the shape of the torches which existed in the 19th Century. The continuity of the flame burning was provided by a special content known as "Tipizir 120/140". Thanks to this, the flame was able to burn for 22 hours non-stop.
1964
Tokio
Summer Games
The minimalistic design of the torch by architect, Kenzo Tange, was dedicated to the trends which were in fashion in the sixties. With a handle separated from the 'shaft' of the torch by a round sword, it resembled a fencing sword.